Brazil: Latin America’s political turbulence

Since taking office in 2010, former President Dilma Rousseff has overseen a period of economic growth in Brazil. Under her presidency, inflation remained under control and the country has enjoyed a record-breaking economic recovery….

Brazil: Latin America's political turbulence

Since taking office in 2010, former President Dilma Rousseff has overseen a period of economic growth in Brazil.

Under her presidency, inflation remained under control and the country has enjoyed a record-breaking economic recovery.

The country entered the 2016 Summer Olympics on a high note. At Rio 2016, the economy accounted for 25% of global revenues, with more than 600,000 foreigners visiting Brazil in their pursuit of the coveted “Brazilian Dream.”

In her first term, Rousseff pursued a liberal program of economic reforms, which has contributed to the nation’s current economic progress.

The former president began her tenure as Brazil’s first female president with deep reformist objectives, which she succeeded in.

Rousseff was constitutionally impeached in March 2017, amid a political crisis that began when she was accused of manipulating government accounting figures in 2013. The year began with a huge and popular anti-corruption movement.

Over the past year, the global community has lost much of its appetite for Latin America’s boom economy. The U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research, which determines the minimum time to determine the beginning and end of recessions, said Brazil’s recession was over in March 2017. Yet, subsequent slow growth across Brazil has continued into 2018.

With less than two months left in office, as economic recovery stutters, many of Rousseff’s reforms continue to face stiff opposition.

Many perceive Rousseff’s defense of her impeachment as a fight for the poor. Meanwhile, the country is being stripped of its proud reputation as one of the most welcoming and supportive countries to migrants in the world.

While she served as leader, Rousseff escaped death in 2011 when a bomb injured her at a political rally in Toulouse, France.

Before being elected as Brazil’s first female president, Rousseff served as mayor of Recife.

(CNN) — Dilma Rousseff, one of the most renowned and powerful politicians in Latin America, was impeached on accusations of corruption.

She served as president from 2011 until last March, when she was removed from office and replaced by interim president Michel Temer. Her removal marks the end of a tortured ride for a politician who rose to power through a corruption scandal but came to symbolize popular discontent with the ruling party.

Presidentially elected in 2010, Rousseff undertook an aggressive agenda of reform and implementation to resuscitate the ailing economy and tackle poverty in the country.

Today, the once-booming Brazilian economy has been threatened by a mix of political and economic hurdles, but is still growing.

Following Rousseff’s impeachment, Temer is serving as interim president until the country holds a parliamentary election in the fall.

But the showy politician has struggled to complete his agenda. Temer came under fire for increasing fuel prices. He was recently threatened with impeachment over an ongoing corruption scandal.

Rousseff was once a fixture of society, starting out as a Marxist-influenced radical activist in the early 1960s. She married economist Joao Santana, a friend from their university days.

Rousseff was first elected as mayor of Recife in 1988 before going on to win a landslide victory as the federal minister of planning and development in 1998.

In 2003, after working with Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva (formerly Lula), Rousseff was elected Brazil’s first female president.

Rousseff defended her impeachment as being all about helping the poor of the country, and vowed to continue a broad social program. But also continued her push for social inclusion in Brazil, calling for free contraception for women and more social assistance.

(CNN) — Dilma Rousseff, one of the most renowned and powerful politicians in Latin America, was impeached on accusations of corruption.

She served as president from 2011 until last March, when she was removed from office and replaced by interim president Michel Temer. Her removal marks the end of a tortured ride for a politician who rose to power through a corruption scandal but came to symbolize popular discontent with the ruling party.

Presidentially elected in 2010, Rousseff undertook an aggressive agenda of reform and implementation to resuscitate the ailing economy and tackle poverty in the country.

Today, the once-booming Brazilian economy has been threatened by a mix of political and economic hurdles, but is still growing.

Following Rousseff’s impeachment, Temer is serving as interim president until the country holds a parliamentary election in the fall.

But the showy politician has struggled to complete his agenda. Temer came under fire for increasing fuel prices. He was recently threatened with impeachment over an ongoing corruption scandal.

Rousseff was once a fixture of society, starting out as a Marxist-influenced radical activist in the early 1960s. She married economist Joao Santana, a friend from their university days.

Rousseff was first elected as mayor of Recife in 1988 before going on

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